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Remember that time when

howtobeterrell:

during the draft riots (American Civil War), the irish were going around NY killing and lynching black folk..

They burned down (with children inside) a Negro Orphanage for Girls…Yes Black girls you read that right.. 

and they were also throwing black babies out of windows into fires and shit..

remember that.

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Waco Horror: Jesse Washington Lynching Happened 96 Years Ago Today

Of the atrocities levied upon African Americans at the hands of White racist America, the public burning and lynching of teen farmhand Jesse Washington stands as one of the most vivid reminders of this country’s ugly past. The public outcry of the lynching sparked journalists and others to condemn the lynching, with theNAACP hiring suffragist Elizabeth Freeman to investigate the findings. Leading scholar and NAACP journalist W.E.B. Du Bois also reported on the lynching, dubbing the event the “Waco Horror.”

Jesse Washington worked on a farm owned by George and Lucy Fryer, English immigrants who were well-known in their farming community. On May 8, 1916, Lucy Fryer was murdered in her home and the news spread quickly as locals immediately named Washington as a suspect. Washington was arrested and held for questioning alongside his family — this after authorities discovered blood on his overalls that he attributed to a nosebleed.

Although Washington denied any wrongdoing, some feel that he was pressured into confessing to the rape and murder of Mrs. Fryer. History professor at Baylor University James M. SoRelle suggested that Washington may have been mentally challenged and that he may not have had a good recollection of the events that evening.

A lynch mob stormed the local jail to serve their version of justice, but Washington was moved to another location. After several days, Washington’s trial was held May 15 to a packed courthouse rabid for vengeance. Although his responses were deemed unintelligible, Washington was deemed guilty and ordered to be publicly lynched.

After being dragged through the street by court officials and getting beaten, stabbed, and kicked by the mob, he was covered in oil and hung from a tree with a chain. The mob cut off his genitals, fingers, and toes.

Washington was lit ablaze as executioners kept him alive long enough to continue his suffering.

After he died, bystanders collected memorabilia from the scene. Papers in cities as far away as New York and even overseas in London reported on the lynching of Washington. The New York Times said:

“In no other land even pretending to be civilized could a man be burned to death in the streets of a considerable city amid the savage exultation of its inhabitants.”

W.E.B. Du Bois also remarked on the lynching in part, saying, “Any talk of the triumph of Christianity, or the spread of human culture, is idle twaddle as long as the Waco lynching is possible in the United States.”

Elizabeth Freeman and other researchers in later times concluded that Washington may have killed Dryer due to harsh treatment from her husband but do not think he had the wherewithal to sexually assault her.

The lynching highlighted the racial tensions of the South and how the rise of theKu Klux Klan coincided with the killings and assaults of Blacks during the early 1900s. The legacy of the Waco Horror gave way to a very public criticism of the practice, with many likening Washington as a sacrifice as many White residents held archaic notions of Black people as evil beings.

The actions of the lynching would mark the Waco area as a haven for White racists, as many African Americans in the area began to show resistance to the oppression felt in their town. As one of the ugly reminders of the racism Black people suffered in through the 20th century, the Waco Horror’s chilling images only need to be seen once to burn their way into one’s minds forever.

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Rep. André Carson: Tea party members of Congress want blacks ‘hanging on a tree’

By Rachel Rose Hartman | The Ticket –Wed, Aug 31, 2011

Carson addresses supporters on Election Day 2010 (Darron Cummings/AP)

André Carson, a Democratic representative from Indiana and a member of the Congressional Black Caucus, suggested last week that certain members of the tea party in Congress are indistinguishable from violent racists.

"This is the effort that we’re seeing of Jim Crow. Some of these folks in Congress right now would love to see us as second-class citizens," Carson said at a caucus event in Miami on Aug. 22. "Some of them in Congress right now of this tea party movement would love to see you and me … hanging on a tree."

A video of the comments was circulated Tuesday by a video producer at “The Blaze,” news and opinion site run by Glenn Beck, the former Fox News host.

Watch the video below:

The video features only an edited clip of Carson’s remarks, but the lawmaker’s office has confirmed the statement to news outlets including the Washington Post.

The comments were “prompted in response to frustration voiced by many in Miami and in his home district in Indianapolis regarding Congress’ inability to bolster the economy,” Jason Tomcsi, a Carson spokesman, said in a statement issued to news outlets. “The Tea Party is protecting its millionaire and oil company friends while gutting critical services that they know protect the livelihood of African-Americans, as well as Latinos and other disadvantaged minorities. We are talking about child nutrition, job creation, job training, housing assistance, and Head Start, and that is just the beginning. A child without basic nutrition, secure housing, and quality education has no real chance at a meaningful and productive life.”

Tomcsi continued, stating that “yes, the congressman used strong language because the Tea Party agenda jeopardizes our most vulnerable and leaves them without the ability to improve their economic standing.”

Carson’s statement marks the second time in recent weeks the Congressional Black Caucus has used unusually blunt language to criticize the tea party.

Caucus member Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) earlier this month told an audience gathered for a community meeting in California “the tea party can go straight to hell.

A fight between the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the tea party over racism was brewing earlier this year. Leaders of each group accused the other of being racist. Tea Party Express leader Mark Williams called for an end to that war of words in July and removed from his personal website an imaginary letter to President Abraham Lincoln that accused the NAACP of being racist for using the word “colored” in its name.