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Everyday People Stories.
Johannesburg, South Africa.

Images by Cedric Nzaka.

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(via nocturnalphantasmagoria)

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PSA: It was obviously racist back then… How do you NOT know better, now?

preemptive Halloween “costume” warning  

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Lion head.

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NUGGETRY Saturn OG

NUGGETRY Saturn OG



The planetary strains made a name for themselves a few summers back and have remained a strong group of strains ever since. NUGGETRY Saturn OG is a prime example of well grown genetics bred to perfection.

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Al Green-Lets Stay Together

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Jealousy by NinthTaboo
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nokiabae:

"WHITEWASH" a Documentary On The Black Experience In Surfing

Whitewash explores the African-American experience and race in surfing. It touches on some pertinent issues about how the history of surfing was detached from it’s indigenous Hawaiian origins and largely regarded as having it’s founding or “discovery” with European settlers. It also focuses on the issues of segregation and racism at beaches in California and of how the belief that “black people can’t swim” was passed down from generation to generation. 

I’m so glad this documentary exists. There is also great evidence of sea culture in West Africa which after the slave trade forced the people to move inland. Surfing has never been a white-trait. 

nokiabae:

"WHITEWASH" a Documentary On The Black Experience In Surfing

Whitewash explores the African-American experience and race in surfing. It touches on some pertinent issues about how the history of surfing was detached from it’s indigenous Hawaiian origins and largely regarded as having it’s founding or “discovery” with European settlers. It also focuses on the issues of segregation and racism at beaches in California and of how the belief that “black people can’t swim” was passed down from generation to generation. 

I’m so glad this documentary exists. There is also great evidence of sea culture in West Africa which after the slave trade forced the people to move inland. Surfing has never been a white-trait. 

NubianBrothaz.tumblr.com