SpaceWaves::  

Short History: The Nuba and The African Origin of ALL Martial Artshttp://forwardmotion.home.att.net/nuba.html
 Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢: The Original Art
 The following article by Nijel BPG first appeared in The BKF Magazine, July 1999. REVISED July 1, 2000.
NUBA WRESTLINGâ„¢ - The African Origins of the Martial Arts Revealed!
by Nijel BPG
“The Nuba of Sudan, Africa practiced a form of martial arts wrestling over 2,800 years before Christ. There are no other records in any corner of the world that can claim such a long, and unbroken martial arts tradition. This form of martial arts, which included weapons as well as fortification, and certainly empty hand self-defense blossomed in 12th Dynasty Egypt. Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢ is the original martial art that all of Africa, Asia, and Europe later came to benefit from”.
Excerpt from “Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢: The Original Art”
Millions of African-Americans, and Black people all over the world study Kung-Fu, Tae Kwon Do, Judo, Karate, or some other form of martial arts. Many of them will tell you that it has transformed their lives. Therefore books, videos, magazines, television and films will continue to portray the martial arts. There are even comic book characters such as Karnak, the 1960’s Marvel superhero and member of the mutant group known as the Inhumans. Karnak is a martial arts master who is able to discern the stress point of any solid object, no matter how large, and shatter that object with one powerful, and well placed karate chop.
As popular as the martial arts was and continues to be, less than one percent of Africans in diaspora, and only a slightly higher percentage of Asians, and Europeans are aware that the true origins of these magnificent arts are in fact African! Many African teens who fantasized themselves becoming the powerful Karnak, will be surprised to learn that he was actually named after an ancient African temple in Egypt, and that the very name of his ancient discipline bespoke it’s origin. It is only recently that modern science and anthropology has agreed to admit that all human life shares a common point of origin in Africa. It was a watershed day therefore, when the untold origins of the oldest martial arts on Earth were explored and documented in my 1990 book titled “Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢: The Original Art”. While not in general circulation, it is heralded as a landmark publication because it was the first global acknowledgement of Africa as the birthplace of the martial arts and sciences.
The entire scope of the African origins of the martial arts, and their related disciplines are too vast to cover in the scope of a single article. I will present some key excerpts from my book as well as information that I will elaborate on in an upcoming publication. What you are going to read will shed light on the who, what, and where, regarding the origins of the martial arts, as well as the influence this has had worldwide. Later, I will reveal some startling clues as to why the sciences of the martial arts developed as they did, and why they must continue to evolve.
In this year 2000 of the Olympic Games, there are many people who would argue that Greece, contains the oldest records of combative arts such as wrestling, boxing, and Pankration. While the western world can easily identify with Greek art, literature, philosophy, sport, military arts and sciences, as well as other significant aspects of Greek thought such as astronomy, and mathematics, these aforementioned arts and sciences did not originate in Greece. There is ample evidence and testimony by acclaimed philosophers and historians of ancient Greece such as Herodotus in 500 BCE, Pythagoras, Plato, and many others to support this fact. Many of them were put to death for the knowledge they imported into Greece. So significant was the source of Greek knowledge and culture, that the earliest inhabitants of the land derived their very name Greece from an ancient name for Africa, “Nigrecia”!
The year was 776 B.C. at a time when Egypt was already ancient, that the Greeks began the practice of wrestling in honor of the African God Amon, whom they renamed Zeus. the entire Greek pantheon of Gods and Goddesses are based on African deities that were simply renamed. Despite all of this however, it is significant to our study that Greece provides one of the first instances of a martial art and religious tradition being combined in the west. However, it was a tradition based on older African practices that the Greeks adopted, but never fully applied.
All present day scholars of what is commonly known as Greco-Roman wrestling attribute the origins of their sport to illustrations discovered on the walls of tombs at a region of ancient Egypt called Mahez, which as been renamed “Beni Hasan”, or “hill of the son of the Hasan family”. Although considered just a sport today, these illustrations point to a well developed science that actually developed in Nubia, but reached the zenith of expression in Egypt.
*At Beni Hasan, in four separate tombs, there are hundreds of paintings on limestone walls that for the most part, have since decayed. The paintings are of African martial artists using a variety of wrestling holds and locks. The illustrations total well over 500 individual pairs of wrestlers who are executing hundreds of sophisticated techniques. These images are mainly recorded in the tombs of governors, or princes by the names of Baqet III, his son Khety, and his son Amenemhat. They all reigned in Mahez during the 11th and 12th Dynasties. Illustrations were also found in the well known tomb of Prince Khemenhotep!!. The paintings feature pairs of fighters who are wrestling, as well as illustrations of warriors using other forms of unarmed combat that employ kicking and punching techniques. There are scenes of martial artists using weapons such as a lance, short sticks, daggers, staffs, and bow and arrows. There are even scenes of warriors utilizing military technology such as a testudo, which is a shielding device used during the siege of a castle. The earliest representation of a castle in the world can be found illustrated on an incense holder that originates from Nubia, the “mother civilization” of Egypt. Several paintings of castles in the Mahez tombs predates what we believe about the birth of castles, fortifications and medieval technology from Europe’s Middle Ages. All total, these paintings in Africa represent the most ancient, and prolific depiction of martial arts on Earth.*
Besides the accounts of ancient Greek historians themselves, information confirming the Greek’s access to Egyptian arts and sciences were recorded by 17th and 18th century Europeans in Egypt such as Edme F. Jomard, James Burton, Jean Champollion, Robert Hay, and others. The most complete and often referred to archeological study of the Mahez tombs were compiled by the Englishman Percy Newberry. Working for the Archaeological Survey of Egypt between 1890 and 1892, Newberry carried out “excavations” at Beni Hasan. The results were published in a two volume work as the First and Second Memoirs of the ASE (Percy E. Newberry, Beni Hasan, Part I [London, 1893] and Beni Hasan, Part II [London, 1893]. He states that graffiti on the walls that were written in Greek further proves that the Greeks were frequent visitors to the tombs in ancient times.
Short History: The Nuba and The African Origin of ALL Martial Artshttp://forwardmotion.home.att.net/nuba.html
 Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢: The Original Art
 The following article by Nijel BPG first appeared in The BKF Magazine, July 1999. REVISED July 1, 2000.
NUBA WRESTLINGâ„¢ - The African Origins of the Martial Arts Revealed!
by Nijel BPG
“The Nuba of Sudan, Africa practiced a form of martial arts wrestling over 2,800 years before Christ. There are no other records in any corner of the world that can claim such a long, and unbroken martial arts tradition. This form of martial arts, which included weapons as well as fortification, and certainly empty hand self-defense blossomed in 12th Dynasty Egypt. Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢ is the original martial art that all of Africa, Asia, and Europe later came to benefit from”.
Excerpt from “Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢: The Original Art”
Millions of African-Americans, and Black people all over the world study Kung-Fu, Tae Kwon Do, Judo, Karate, or some other form of martial arts. Many of them will tell you that it has transformed their lives. Therefore books, videos, magazines, television and films will continue to portray the martial arts. There are even comic book characters such as Karnak, the 1960’s Marvel superhero and member of the mutant group known as the Inhumans. Karnak is a martial arts master who is able to discern the stress point of any solid object, no matter how large, and shatter that object with one powerful, and well placed karate chop.
http://www.assatashakur.org/forum/guerrilla-warfare-tactic-technique-survival/18222-short-history-nuba-african-origin-all-m

SpaceWaves::  

Short History: The Nuba and The African Origin of ALL Martial Artshttp://forwardmotion.home.att.net/nuba.html


Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢: The Original Art


The following article by Nijel BPG first appeared in The BKF Magazine, July 1999.
REVISED July 1, 2000.

NUBA WRESTLINGâ„¢ - The African Origins of the Martial Arts Revealed!

by Nijel BPG

“The Nuba of Sudan, Africa practiced a form of martial arts wrestling over 2,800 years before Christ. There are no other records in any corner of the world that can claim such a long, and unbroken martial arts tradition. This form of martial arts, which included weapons as well as fortification, and certainly empty hand self-defense blossomed in 12th Dynasty Egypt. Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢ is the original martial art that all of Africa, Asia, and Europe later came to benefit from”.

Excerpt from “Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢: The Original Art”

Millions of African-Americans, and Black people all over the world study Kung-Fu, Tae Kwon Do, Judo, Karate, or some other form of martial arts. Many of them will tell you that it has transformed their lives. Therefore books, videos, magazines, television and films will continue to portray the martial arts. There are even comic book characters such as Karnak, the 1960’s Marvel superhero and member of the mutant group known as the Inhumans. Karnak is a martial arts master who is able to discern the stress point of any solid object, no matter how large, and shatter that object with one powerful, and well placed karate chop.

As popular as the martial arts was and continues to be, less than one percent of Africans in diaspora, and only a slightly higher percentage of Asians, and Europeans are aware that the true origins of these magnificent arts are in fact African! Many African teens who fantasized themselves becoming the powerful Karnak, will be surprised to learn that he was actually named after an ancient African temple in Egypt, and that the very name of his ancient discipline bespoke it’s origin. It is only recently that modern science and anthropology has agreed to admit that all human life shares a common point of origin in Africa. It was a watershed day therefore, when the untold origins of the oldest martial arts on Earth were explored and documented in my 1990 book titled “Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢: The Original Art”. While not in general circulation, it is heralded as a landmark publication because it was the first global acknowledgement of Africa as the birthplace of the martial arts and sciences.

The entire scope of the African origins of the martial arts, and their related disciplines are too vast to cover in the scope of a single article. I will present some key excerpts from my book as well as information that I will elaborate on in an upcoming publication. What you are going to read will shed light on the who, what, and where, regarding the origins of the martial arts, as well as the influence this has had worldwide. Later, I will reveal some startling clues as to why the sciences of the martial arts developed as they did, and why they must continue to evolve.

In this year 2000 of the Olympic Games, there are many people who would argue that Greece, contains the oldest records of combative arts such as wrestling, boxing, and Pankration. While the western world can easily identify with Greek art, literature, philosophy, sport, military arts and sciences, as well as other significant aspects of Greek thought such as astronomy, and mathematics, these aforementioned arts and sciences did not originate in Greece. There is ample evidence and testimony by acclaimed philosophers and historians of ancient Greece such as Herodotus in 500 BCE, Pythagoras, Plato, and many others to support this fact. Many of them were put to death for the knowledge they imported into Greece. So significant was the source of Greek knowledge and culture, that the earliest inhabitants of the land derived their very name Greece from an ancient name for Africa, “Nigrecia”!

The year was 776 B.C. at a time when Egypt was already ancient, that the Greeks began the practice of wrestling in honor of the African God Amon, whom they renamed Zeus. the entire Greek pantheon of Gods and Goddesses are based on African deities that were simply renamed. Despite all of this however, it is significant to our study that Greece provides one of the first instances of a martial art and religious tradition being combined in the west. However, it was a tradition based on older African practices that the Greeks adopted, but never fully applied.

All present day scholars of what is commonly known as Greco-Roman wrestling attribute the origins of their sport to illustrations discovered on the walls of tombs at a region of ancient Egypt called Mahez, which as been renamed “Beni Hasan”, or “hill of the son of the Hasan family”. Although considered just a sport today, these illustrations point to a well developed science that actually developed in Nubia, but reached the zenith of expression in Egypt.

*At Beni Hasan, in four separate tombs, there are hundreds of paintings on limestone walls that for the most part, have since decayed. The paintings are of African martial artists using a variety of wrestling holds and locks. The illustrations total well over 500 individual pairs of wrestlers who are executing hundreds of sophisticated techniques. These images are mainly recorded in the tombs of governors, or princes by the names of Baqet III, his son Khety, and his son Amenemhat. They all reigned in Mahez during the 11th and 12th Dynasties. Illustrations were also found in the well known tomb of Prince Khemenhotep!!. The paintings feature pairs of fighters who are wrestling, as well as illustrations of warriors using other forms of unarmed combat that employ kicking and punching techniques. There are scenes of martial artists using weapons such as a lance, short sticks, daggers, staffs, and bow and arrows. There are even scenes of warriors utilizing military technology such as a testudo, which is a shielding device used during the siege of a castle. The earliest representation of a castle in the world can be found illustrated on an incense holder that originates from Nubia, the “mother civilization” of Egypt. Several paintings of castles in the Mahez tombs predates what we believe about the birth of castles, fortifications and medieval technology from Europe’s Middle Ages. All total, these paintings in Africa represent the most ancient, and prolific depiction of martial arts on Earth.*

Besides the accounts of ancient Greek historians themselves, information confirming the Greek’s access to Egyptian arts and sciences were recorded by 17th and 18th century Europeans in Egypt such as Edme F. Jomard, James Burton, Jean Champollion, Robert Hay, and others. The most complete and often referred to archeological study of the Mahez tombs were compiled by the Englishman Percy Newberry. Working for the Archaeological Survey of Egypt between 1890 and 1892, Newberry carried out “excavations” at Beni Hasan. The results were published in a two volume work as the First and Second Memoirs of the ASE (Percy E. Newberry, Beni Hasan, Part I [London, 1893] and Beni Hasan, Part II [London, 1893]. He states that graffiti on the walls that were written in Greek further proves that the Greeks were frequent visitors to the tombs in ancient times.

Short History: The Nuba and The African Origin of ALL Martial Artshttp://forwardmotion.home.att.net/nuba.html


Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢: The Original Art


The following article by Nijel BPG first appeared in The BKF Magazine, July 1999.
REVISED July 1, 2000.

NUBA WRESTLINGâ„¢ - The African Origins of the Martial Arts Revealed!

by Nijel BPG

“The Nuba of Sudan, Africa practiced a form of martial arts wrestling over 2,800 years before Christ. There are no other records in any corner of the world that can claim such a long, and unbroken martial arts tradition. This form of martial arts, which included weapons as well as fortification, and certainly empty hand self-defense blossomed in 12th Dynasty Egypt. Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢ is the original martial art that all of Africa, Asia, and Europe later came to benefit from”.

Excerpt from “Nuba Wrestlingâ„¢: The Original Art”

Millions of African-Americans, and Black people all over the world study Kung-Fu, Tae Kwon Do, Judo, Karate, or some other form of martial arts. Many of them will tell you that it has transformed their lives. Therefore books, videos, magazines, television and films will continue to portray the martial arts. There are even comic book characters such as Karnak, the 1960’s Marvel superhero and member of the mutant group known as the Inhumans. Karnak is a martial arts master who is able to discern the stress point of any solid object, no matter how large, and shatter that object with one powerful, and well placed karate chop.

http://www.assatashakur.org/forum/guerrilla-warfare-tactic-technique-survival/18222-short-history-nuba-african-origin-all-m

(Source: trelleoftears, via leonking23)