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Ballynahow Bay, County Kerry, Ireland

Ballynahow Bay, County Kerry, Ireland

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Photoset
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madelinebestesart:

tropical city island
minneapolis

madelinebestesart:

tropical city island

minneapolis

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Phattie in  the house

Phattie in  the house

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(Source: hisazz2phat, via stormothcent)

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Josh Marquez

Josh Marquez

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(Source: dandmedia, via 808sandhoes)

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He’s nice.

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(via domo2be)

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Hey baby, I’m available!

Hey baby, I’m available!

 NubianBrothaz.tumblr.com

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Nugget Point Lighthouse at Sunrise, South Island, New Zealand

Nugget Point Lighthouse at Sunrise, South Island, New Zealand

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dumbledoresarmy-againstbigotry:

buttonpoetry:

Support the artist! Watch the full poem: Javon Johnson - “cuz he’s black”

this is so relevant in light of recent events of police brutality against MIchael Brown and john Crawford. #blacklivesmatter

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(via yungprofesora)

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(via chorjavon)

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It’s Perfectly Legal To Film The Cops

 
FERGUSON

Snapping photos of police in Ferguson, Missouri, may have gotten Huffington Post reporter Ryan J. Reilly arrested Wednesday night while he was covering protests prompted by the death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager who was shot to death by a police officer.

Reilly and Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowrey were detained and assaulted after attempting to film a swarm of police officers inside a McDonald’s. An officer slammed Reilly’s head into a glass window, and Lowery was shoved into a soda fountain while wearing press credentials around his neck. Both were later released without being charged with breaking any laws.

“They essentially acted as a military force,” said Reilly, who was in the restaurant to charge his phone and computer. “It was incredible.”

In recent years, there have been countless cases of police officers ordering people to turn off their cameras, confiscating phones, and, like Reilly, arresting those who attempt to capture footage of them. Despite a common misconception, it’s actually perfectly legal to film police officers on the job.

“There are First Amendment protections for people photographing and recording in public,” Mickey Osterreicher, an attorney with the National Press Photographers Association, told The Huffington Post. According to Osterreicher, as long as you don’t get in their way, it’s perfectly legal to take photos and videos of police officers everywhere in the United States.

This misconception is pervasive enough that the New York City Police Departmentcirculated a memo last week reminding officers.

“Members of the public are legally allowed to record police interactions,” the memo states, according to the Daily News. “Intentional interference such as blocking or obstructing cameras or ordering the person to cease constitutes censorship and also violates the First Amendment.”

The NYPD’s reminder comes as police activity is in the national spotlight. Just two days after Michael Brown’s death, cops in Los Angeles shot to death an unarmed black man who allegedly struggled with mental illness. And three weeks ago, a New York City police officer put Eric Garner in an illegal chokehold that left him dead after gasping “I can’t breathe!” A bystander caught the entire thing on video.

Those deaths, along with the arrests of Reilly and Lowrey, have raised questions about what, if anything, individuals can do to hold the police accountable for their actions. But one unquestionable right people have is to capture officers on film.

“There’s no law anywhere in the United States that prohibits people from recording the police on the street, in a park, or any other place where the public is generally allowed,” Osterreicher said.

So why do so many police officers still act as though that isn’t the case?

“Probably because they haven’t been trained otherwise,” said Osterreicher. “I think that there are many officers that believe that the minute they tell somebody to do or not do something, that that’s an order. But police can only order somebody to do or not do something based on the law, and there is no law that says you can not record or photograph out in public.”

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prettyboyshyflizzy:

guitarsandcontrabandx:

grrlyman:

Imma frame this.

this picture is everything.

bruhhh how can i get this on a shirt?  anyone have a larger version of this ?

prettyboyshyflizzy:

guitarsandcontrabandx:

grrlyman:

Imma frame this.

this picture is everything.

bruhhh how can i get this on a shirt?  anyone have a larger version of this ?

nubianbrothaz.tumblr.com

(via amemberoftheblackcommunity)

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cho-yu:

racebending:

chosengamer:

jamietheignorantamerican:

Go Forth and Educate Yourselves!

I’d also highly recommend watching the Jane Elliot Brown-eye/Blue-eye experiments, which can be found here:

Not only should you educate yourself but use this for good. Look around you and help others who don’t have this privilege. Hiring, donating, community service, etc.

After this post went viral, the original artist had to delete their tumblr because they were inundated with death threats.

There were people more offended by this comic than offended by the existence of racial disparities—to the point where they threatened this artist’s life.

people are fucking disgusting, I hope the original artist is doing okay now because they are an amazing person to draw this.

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(via lovelyandbrown)

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BAGHDAD USA

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